Designs don’t always transfer from screen to paper smoothly. Here’s your print-ready checklist.

Pixels Per Inch

If your art has already been converted to vector, don’t worry about this. If you’re not, make sure your design is at least 300 PPI (pixels per inch).

First, make sure you have the highest resolution possible. Then, measure the PPI by dividing the width of the artwork’s dimension by the width of the size you are printing.

So if your design was 900 pixels wide and you are printing a 3-inch wide logo, your PPI is 300. Anything under that will be a low-quality print. It will look pixilated.

To figure out the biggest size you can print at, divide your dimensions by 300. So 600 by 450 will be 2 by 1.

CMYK

Screens use red, green and blue light (RGB) for colors. Printers use cyan, magenta, yellow, and black ink (CMYK).

In most programs (Adobe), you can change the color mode very easily.

When you are designing for print, start in CMYK mode.

Use Inches

Using this as a measurement instead of pixels helps in more than one way. You won’t have to do any math for the exact dimensions.

Then, it will make it easier for you to indicate exact cut lines for any print shop.

Cut Lines

This is how we know where to cut your sticker. We do this for you and send you a proof unless you made your own.

You can make them in Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator if you want full control of where we will make cuts for your proofs.

Use a 1 point line to indicate them.

Watch Out For Bleeds

This is anything past the cut line. It is needed when you want to leave no white margin.

We will add this for you, but if you send something complex make sure the color extends past the cut line.

Our process is fast and easy. Upload your image at checkout. Then, we ship in 24 hours when you approve the proof.

We offer a 30-day money-back garuntee because we are so confident in our product’s quality.

We offer bulk discounts when you order stickers from us.

10% of all purchases go to the Jacksonville Boys and Girls Club

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